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Opossum
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Sevices Animal Damage
Horses that come into contact with opossum droppings are susceptible to infection by a protozoan parasite, called Sarcocystis neurona, that can invade the central nervous system. In some horses, the parasite can cause a serious illness known as equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, or EPM. This disease can be fatal: the parasite can infect the brain and the spinal cord, causing progressive inflammation and necrosis. However, it is not uncommon for a horse to develop a protective immune response to the parasite, and some equines will show no signs of infection.
Question: Why do oppossum play dead?
Answer: They use this as a defense when they feel threatened called a catatonic state. They may also hiss and use a rear gland to emit a foul smelling fluid. They also bare their teeth and hiss, and are great climbers.
Question: How long do they live?
Answer: The life span is one to four years most do not amke it through the first year.
Question: Do they have babies like rats?
Answer: The mating season is from January through June. They can have as meany as 15 babies, they are born hairless and blind. The mother carries the babies in a pouch and they remain there for seven to eight weeks. They have also been seen riding on the mothers back.The can have as many as three litters a year.
Question: Where do they live?
Answer: They can live any where they can find shelter. Woodlots, farms, fields, in attics, under crwal spaces of homes.
Question: What do they eat?
Answer: They are scavengers, they will eat dog and cat food left outside. trash from trash cans, compost.
Click here for more information on health risks & Diseases
Photo #7
Fox
Photo #8
Coyote